The Longitude Prize by Joan Dash

Cover of: The Longitude Prize | Joan Dash

Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) .

Written in English

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Edition Notes

Book details

ContributionsDusan Petricic (Illustrator)
The Physical Object
Number of Pages208
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7423533M
ISBN 100374346364
ISBN 109780374346362

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"The Longitude Prize," by Joan The Longitude Prize book, is a wonderful book for children, 9 to 12 years old, about the 18th century race for an accurate method of determining a ship's longitude. The author makes history come alive and explains how Britain's Parliament offered a prize of 20, pounds (equal to $12 million today) to anyone who found an accurate 5/5(12).

The Longitude Prize Joan Dash Sibert Award Even though I knew the ending to this book Dash’s narrative kept me interested. Her style, void of metaphor, simile, and flowery description, was nonetheless engaging. The use of complex sentence structure that connected ideas and “sounds” like a story teller sounds, kept me turning the pages/5.

Latitude, the north-south position, was easy enough, but once out of sight of land not even the most experienced navigator had a sure method of fixing the British Parliament offered a substantial monetary prize to whoever could invent a device to determine exact longitude at sea.

Longitude Prize Director: Redefine the market makers to transform broken antibiotic and diagnostic market The Longitude Prize is a £10m prize fund, with an £8m payout, that will reward a team of researchers who develop a point–of–care diagnostic test that.

The Longitude Prize by Joan Dash and Dušan Petričić. Many sailors once perished at sea because they had no way of accurately determining read more. Many sailors once perished at sea because they had no way of accurately determining where they were. The Longitude prize was a forerunner to modern innovation prizes like the X Prize for launc I'm that sort of geek, so this book was just perfect for me.

The longitude problem was one of the biggest scientific problems facing humanity in the early s.4/5. The Longitude Prize. Award: Notable Children's Books. Year this Award was Won: 2 Award Win Active Date: Sunday, Novem - Defunct Winner UID: 2 Winner Rank: SLCT.

Sort field for winners: Longitude Prize. Winner Description:. Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal. Year this Award was Won: 2 Award Win Active Date: Sunday, Janu - Defunct Winner UID: 2 Winner Rank: HNR.

Sort field for winners: Longitude Prize. Winner Description: Written by Joan Dash. Illustrated by Dusan Petricic. Published by Frances Foster Books/ Farrar, Straus and. This is the problem discussed in the book, The Longitude Prize. Author Joan Dash describes the problem faced by mariners during the s and why the British government made finding an easy.

"The Longitude Prize," by Joan Dash, is a wonderful book for children, 9 to 12 years old, about the 18th century race for an accurate method of determining a ship's longitude. The author makes history come alive and explains how Britain's Parliament offered a prize of 20, pounds (equal to $12 million today) to anyone who found an accurate 5/5(4).

"The Longitude Prize," by Joan Dash, is a wonderful book for children, 9 to 12 years old, about the 18th century race for an accurate method of The Longitude Prize book a ship's longitude. The author makes history come alive and explains how Britain's Parliament offered a prize of 20, pounds (equal to $12 million today) to anyone who found an accurate 5/5.

Dash (We Shall Not Be Moved) pens an engrossing tale of the scientific contest for the Longitude Prize, which was offered through a act of the British Parliament in response to the devastating lo.

Latitude, the north-south position, was easy enough, but once out of sight of land not even the most experienced navigator had a sure method of fixing longitude. So the British Parliament offered a substantial monetary prize to whoever could invent a device to determine exact longitude at sea.

John Harrison, an obscure 18th-century carpenter and clockmaker from Yorkshire, solved a problem that had plagued sailors for centuries: how to tell East-West location at sea, thereby avoiding shipwrecks and other costly disasters.

To aid sailors, the British government offered the Longitude Prize, an enormous sum of £20, (an amount equal to $12 million today), to the inventor of a device. This week, exactly years since its namesake, the new Longitude prize will be launched; £10m for the solution to one of the greatest challenges facing us right now, a.

Get this from a library. The longitude prize. [Joan Dash; Dušan Petričić] -- The story of John Harrison, inventor of watches and clocks, who spent forty years working on a time-machine which could be used to accurately determine longitude at sea.

The Longitude Act was an act of parliament that offered money in return for the solution to the problem of finding a ship's precise longitude at sea. Find out more about Longitude Harrison began his time working in London with Edmond Halley, second Astronomer Royal and a Commissioner of Longitude.

The future of Longitude Explorer. We’re busy formulating plans for the next edition of the Longitude Explorer Prize, so make sure to sign up to our newsletter for all the latest news, developments and announcements relating to the challenge. Keep up to date with Prize news.

The Longitude Prize: : Joan Dash, Dusan Petricic: Books. Skip to main content. Try Prime Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Basket. Books Go Search Your Today's Deals. I had a hard time getting into The Longitude Prize, perhaps in part because I was expecting more history and less r, after about 20 or 30 pages, I did get invested in the story and was more interested in the book.

Basically, this nonfiction book covers the 18th century attempts to accurately determine longitude while at sea, partly to provide safety to sailing vessels and partly /5(5). The longitude prize Item Preview remove-circle "Frances Foster books." The story of John Harrison, inventor of watches and clocks, who spent forty years working on a time-machine which could be used to accurately determine longitude at sea Access-restricted-item truePages: Some people have liked this book more than Galileo's Daughter but they are really two different kinds of books.

Longitude is a great retelling of a carefully researched "niche" in the history of man's quest for technological achievement while Galileo's story (much like Nabokov's) is the retelling a story from different point of view. To help resolve this problem a prize of £20, was established to be awarded when a proven solution was established.

Two main camps developed - the lunar distance method, which required numerous measurements of the sky and a clear day, and the method using clocks. outer space and the stars. 'Longitude' is a book that's worth reading and Reviews: K.

Chapter 6: The Prize Summary and Analysis. Chapter 6 focuses the primary goal of all the major characters in the book: win the prize by solving the problem of the Longitude. It introduces several early players - Thacket, Newton, Halley, Flamsteed and the Board of Longitude.

Only Halley and the Board play a significant role in subsequent chapters. The Longitude Prize’s Daniel Berman explains how the initiative hopes to tackle the challenge of antimicrobial resistance.

In an interview shortly after winning the Nobel Prize in for discovering penicillin, Sir Alexander Fleming said: “The thoughtless person playing with penicillin treatment is morally responsible for the death of the man who succumbs to infection with the. Free download or read online Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time pdf (ePUB) book.

The first edition of the novel was published inand was written by Dava Sobel. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of pages and is available in Hardcover format.

As Sobel himself says, it is written as an informative not an academic book and it succeeds well. It covers the trials and tribulations of Harrison and the rivalry between the astronomers and horologists in the race for the longitude s: K.

Directed by Charles Sturridge. With Jeremy Irons, Anna Chancellor, Emma Kay, Samuel West. In two parallel stories, the clockmaker John Harrison builds the marine chronometer for safe navigation at sea in the 18th Century and the horologist Rupert Gould becomes obsessed with restoring it in the 20th Century.

The famous Longitude Prize, is a good example. It was offered way back in for the first person who could solve the problem of how to tell your longitude at sea. Click to read more about The Longitude Prize de Joan Dash.

LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers. It took many years and intervention by the king to grant Harrison the recognition and reward he deserved for solving the problem of how to accurately track longitude and for winning the British government prize.

The book offers a detailed map of the world at that time and includes the advancements in the use of longitude since then. The subtitle here tells the reader exactly what the book is about; what it doesn't say is how much fun it is to read.

The Greek astronomers could measure latitude as early as the third century b.c., but more than 2, years passed before the development of a reliable method for measuring longitude. Former New York Times reporter Sobel (coauthor, Arthritis: What Works,etc.) sets.

Eventually, Ms. Sobel writes, a particularly disastrous wreck at the Scilly Isles, near the southwestern tip of England, ''precipitated the famed Longitude Act ofin which Parliament promised a prize of $, for a solution to the longitude problem'' (which would be millions of dollars today).

But longitude, which is how far around the Earth's surface the ship was, was much harder to figure out. This prize led to a new method being developed to make determining longitude much more accurate.

This new prize offers £10 million to individuals who can solve 6. Award-winning science writer Dava Sobel explores the great obsession of eighteenth century science—the longitude problem—and how John Harrison solved it. What was the longitude act and why was it needed. Who was John Harrison and how did he propose to solve the problem of longitude.

What challenges did his solution face. Who was Harrison’s most famous competitor for the longitude prize and how did he propose to solve the problem.

However, John Harrison persevered for something like 50 years finally creating a clock (through much drama with the longitude prize board) that was accurate enough.

For example, one of the big problems was that some metals would shrink and others enlarge based on temperature. The book, unfortunately, can't get the 5th star. The reason comes. The story of the Yorkshire carpenter John Harrison has been made famous by Dava Sobel’s bestselling book Longitude, but it has never been clear why, after building a sea-clock that appeared to work well, Harrison refused to compete for the Longitude prize and spent twenty-four years on further research.

Longitude is a TV drama produced by Granada Television and the A&E Network for Channel 4, first broadcast between 2 and 3 January in the UK on Channel 4 and the US on A& is a dramatisation of the book of the same title by Dava was written and directed by Charles Sturridge and stars Michael Gambon as clockmaker John Harrison (–) and Jeremy Irons as.

But the Board of Longitude was biased against this approach and claiming the prize was no simple matter. Told in parallel is the twentieth century story of Rupert Gould (Jeremy Irons), for whom the restoration of Harrison's clocks to working order became first.

Crowdsourcing has historically cracked scientific problems considered at the time not just to be time-consuming to solve but actually unsolvable.

Infor example, the British government’s Longitude Prize was used to successfully crowdsource a solution to .[Note, the Nova program, "Lost at Sea - The Search For Longitude" was aired on PBS, October 6,and was based on Sobel's book.] CONTENTS Acknowledgments 1. Imaginary Lines 2.

The Sea Before Time 3. Adrift in a Clockwork Universe 4. Time in a Bottle 5. Powder of Sympathy 6. The Prize 7. Cogmaker's Journal 8. Kymm Coveny, who may just possibly read more books than the rest of us combined, doesn't want to be "argumentative." But she points out that the Longitude Prize .

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